Does Grass Seed Expire?

You’ve got a bag of grass seeds that are many years old, and you want to overseed the home lawn but wonder whether the results are badly impacted or not just because the seeds are already three years old! So your question here is: “Does grass seed expire?”

Yes, they DO expire and once these seeds age, they tend to lose a few moistures contained inside as well as lose the capability of germinating. But it also depends on the kind of seeds you bought and how they were stored. Find some useful information that you need through our article today when it comes to the finite shelf life of the grass seeds.

IS IT FINE TO USE GRASS SEEDS THIS YEAR SINCE MY LAST YEAR PURCHASE?

If you dread of using the old seeds since your last year purchase, bring them to keep in a cool yet dry site since they will get a chance to be viable! But if doing that your seeds would have a lower rate of germination — the rate also depends on their species!

How long does grass seed last

How long does grass seed last? It depends! For example, you can have some prairie grass seed for more than ten years in a freezer. So when the seed is well-maintained in a cool and adjusted humidity, they become viable much longer than maintained by other methods.

If having some old grass seeds, but they do not smell rotten like how compost does, just go to plant it without a worry. Though they just germinate around 50%, it’s still much better than throwing them out.

WHAT TO DO IF THE GRASS SEED GO BAD?

It’s highly recommended to only purchase new seed so that you don’t have to waste any garden space at home, your high energy and valuable time. To test the seeds and verify whether the grass seed go bad or not, let’s spread ten seeds out in an even distance apart on a few layers of damp paper towels. Roll them up and put in a plastic bag.

WHAT TO DO IF THE GRASS SEED GO BAD

Next, leave the towel in a cozy spot (65 degrees is okay) in your kitchen for instance, from 2 to 5 days. But you need to keep it away straight from the sun. Check them every couple of days! This is the time when you must see whether they have or have not germinated! If they don’t – or just a few have in a few weeks, the chances that they will go bad at last.

Another good and facile indoor way to know about the viability of your old grass seed is to plant them in a potting mixture. Water them and then wait to see how well they can germinate. Once finding their germination rate less than usual, basically sow them at a thicker rate than normal to make up for that.

FOLLOW A PROPER PLANTING PROCEDURE

Every grass seed needs to have a sufficient contact between seed and soil before sprouting completely. In other words, keep the planting depth at a size that should never exceed ¼ inch. Besides, make sure the soil to bear a high moisture content so that it can easily enter into the seeds.

So ready? Here are our step-by-step instruction on how to plant your grass seed:

STEP 1: REMOVE TRACES OF YOUR OLD LAWN 

Begin your digging work to diminish all existent traces of your old lawn, and once that area is not large but little enough, around 150 square feet, use a shovel with a flat blade to dig up. For the huger lawn, save more time by hiring a sod cutter, instead.

STEP 2: TEST YOUR SOIL

If you use the grass see that can germinate strong, then guarantee your soul to maintain the right pH. And your grass seeds would grow best in a type of soul that owns a pH from 6.0 to 7.5.

TEST YOUR SOIL

To test it, own a kit made of testing the soil, where you can find in a hardware shop. Add a bit soil and water in a vial from the kit, wait for the color change. Follow the color-coded chart of the vial to learn more about your soil.

For example, if the soul goes under 6.0, it’s too much acidic, so you need to add lime to increase the pH. When it’s around 8.0, mix it with some moss to balance the pH. While it feels alkaline, then the soil is above 8.0, add sulfur for balancement.

STEP 3: MAKE THE PLANTING AREA

Sprinkle one inch of sand on your planting area and start to till it. Later, spread your compost out and till more until all of them (soil, sand, and compost) are perfectly blended.

STEP 4: MAKE SOIL AMENDMENT

Depending on the result of your soil-testing process, you can choose to amend it with peat moss or lime. Use one spread or a shovel to apply any of them. Next, spread out the starter fertilizer to your planting area.

STEP 5: DISPERSE YOUR GRASS SEED

DISPERSE YOUR GRASS SEED

Purchase the seeds that best suit your regions, and don’t forget to avail a spreader to spread them on your planting region. If it’s a huge lawn, you can save time by doing it with a walk-behind broadcast spreader.

STEP 6: WATER YOUR AREA

Use a sprinkler to water the whole planting area. If feeling necessary, try to build 2 or more sprinklers to guarantee the entire coverage.

Within the initial ten days, water the region about three times daily, but keep the process lasting only 10 minutes per time. Besides, try to water in the morning since there will be fewer evaporation from the sun. And then you can wait for the grass to grow without a hassle.

FINAL WORDS

To sum up, your grass seeds DO expire, and two years is usually the average duration of their shelf-life from the date you purchased them. However, as we told above, it’s fine to use your old seeds as long as they’re well-kept dry and away from the sun. And by doing so — I mean germinating old seeds is a good way to compensate for your last year’s excesses.

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